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March 24th 1923France

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Auroville, India

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"Today, we must forget the difficulties of the past and fully enjoy seeing the miracle of its realisation being finally accomplished."
Roger Anger

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Article last edited by Bostjan on
June 29th, 2018

Roger Anger Change this

Change thisAuroville, India
born 1923
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Roger Anger (24 March 1923 – 15 January 2008) was a French architect who worked on the Auroville project, designed by Mirra Alfassa and endorsed by UNESCO and the Government of India. He also collaborated with Pierre Puccinelli at the Île Verte in Grenoble.

Auroville

Anger was a chief architect of the international township of Auroville and member of the Governing Board of the Auroville Foundation. Giving up commercial architecture, he dissolved his partnership in France to take up the Auroville project as a full-time work. A sculptor, artist, architect and planner designed the Matrimandir, the soul of Auroville, which began in 1964 and was conceived by Sri Aurobindo’s French-born disciple, Mirra Alfassa — “The Mother.” She spoke of a place on earth that could not be claimed or owned by any nation, but where people from all over could live freely and in peace. It was largely designed by Mr. Anger, and inaugurated in 1968 when soils from around the world were symbolically put in an urn along with the Auroville Charter.

At its spiritual and physical heart is the futuristic spherical structure, Matrimandir, a place dedicated to the universal mother. The structure, which has been under construction for over three decades, is a flattened dome spanning 36 metres in diameter, surrounded by gardens, an amphitheatre covered with red Agra stone and meditation rooms. Radiating from the Mandir and its gardens, the city is architecturally conceived along the lines of a galaxy, evolving organically within certain parameters. The completed Mandir is scheduled to be unveiled on February 28, marking the 40th anniversary of Auroville itself. The original design envisaged accommodation for 50,000 residents but now there are only about 1,500. A self-sufficient living, Auroville is considered much more than a place for devotional meditation, as an experiment in self-sufficient living. Its concept and innovative community living make this a place of interest for any visitor.

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