Details

Keywords Change this

Site Specific Installation, Art, Landscape

Birth date / place

July 13th 1935, Casablanca, Morocco

Selected Architecture


Practice / Active in Change this

New York, USA

Linked to Change this

Christo Vladimirov Javacheff
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Article last edited by Bostjan on
June 01st, 2020

Jeanne Claude Change this

Change thisNew York, USA
born 1935, Casablanca
1 of 2

About Change this

Jeanne-Claude, (Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon), French environmental artist (born June 13, 1935, Casablanca, Nov. 18, 2009, New York, N.Y.), was originally described as the publicist and business manager for her artist husband, Christo, but from 1994 she received equal billing with him in all creative and administrative aspects of their work, notably their controversial outdoor sculptures and huge temporary displays of fabrics and plastics. Jeanne-Claude was born in Morocco, where her father was a general in the French army. She received (1952) a bachelor’s degree in Latin and philosophy from the University of Tunis. In 1958 she met Christo Javacheff, who was already working in Paris as an artist; the next year she left her then husband to marry Christo. In 1964 the pair relocated to New York City. Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s first collaborative works included Dockside Packages (1961; Cologne, Ger.) and Iron Curtain—Wall of Oil Drums (1962; Paris). Their best-known “wrapped” projects involved such natural and man-made features as a 2.4-km (1.5-mi) span of coastline in Little Bay near Sydney (draped with 90,000 sq m [1,000,000 sq ft] of synthetic fabric in 1969), the Pont Neuf (bridge) in Paris (covered in beige cloth in 1985), and Berlin’s Reichstag (parliament) building (wrapped in metallic silver fabric in 1995). In an ambitious 1991 project, the couple installed 1,340 giant blue umbrellas across the Sato River valley in Japan and 1,760 giant yellow ones in Tejon Pass, California. The Gates, Central Park, New York City, 1979–2005, built in 2005 along 37 km (23 mi) of walkway in Central Park, featured 7,503 steel gates standing 5 m (16 ft) high and decorated with saffron-coloured cloth panels. Most of the duo’s installations were documented in print and on film.

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